Insulin and Type 1 Diabetes

Medically Reviewed by Dr Sravya, MBBS, MS 

Insulin and Type 1 Diabetes

You will know that there are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. As their names suggest, both have causes, signs, and symptoms, as well as treatments. It is essential to have a better understanding of these types for proper diagnosis and treatment plans. 

If you have type 1 diabetes, you should know that your body is attacking your insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, causing you to have no or little insulin production and increasing blood sugar levels. Studies show that Type 1 diabetes makes up 10–15% of all diabetes  cases.

What are insulin and type 1 diabetes?

 Diabetes type 1 (T1D), also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes, is a lifelong autoimmune condition that occurs when the only insulin-producing beta cells in the body, which are present in the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas, are attacked by the immune system, causing progressive insulin deficiency and persistent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). Insulin is a hormone that helps blood sugar enter the body’s cells so it can be used for energy and induces glucose storage in the liver, muscles, and adipose tissue, resulting in overall weight gain.

How do you get type 1 diabetes?

Diabetes type 1 (T1D), also called insulin-dependent or juvenile diabetes, is a lifelong autoimmune condition that occurs when the only insulin-producing beta cells in the body, which are present in the islets of Langerhans of the pancreas, are attacked by the immune system, causing progressive insulin deficiency and persistent hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). Insulin is a hormone that helps blood sugar enter the body’s cells so it can be used for energy and induces glucose storage in the liver, muscles, and adipose tissue, resulting in overall weight gain.

Who is prone to getting Type 1 diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes usually begins in children and young adults. The peak age to get diagnosed with type 1 diabetes is around 13 or 14 years, but people can be diagnosed when they’re young, as in babies, and older, as in over 40 years.

What are the signs and symptoms of type 1 diabetes?

Its symptoms usually start very mild and get worse within weeks or months as you have no or little insulin production in the body. The sooner your condition is diagnosed, the better for the prevention of any further complications. If you experience the following symptoms, visit a healthcare provider for further assistance.

Untreated or delayed diabetes can lead to further complications, like diabetes-related ketoacidosis. This is a condition when your body starts to use fat for energy production when insulin is not available to convert sugar into energy for a long period of time. This fat breakdown causes the release of ketones. Excessive ketones turn the blood acidic. This is a life-threatening condition.

Seek medical care if any of these signs of diabetic ketoacidosis are noticed:

How do you know if you have type 1 diabetes?

A simple blood test can help anyone find out if they have diabetes. Furthermore, specific tests are done to identify the type of diabetes.

To find out about type 1 diabetes, your physician will ask you to get tested for autoantibodies. In urine tests, the presence of ketone bodies shows type 1 diabetes, and high ketone bodies will cause acetone or a fruity smell on your breath. The physician will also check your A1C (glycated hemoglobin) levels. Your A1C goal may vary depending on your age and various other factors. It helps to know better whether the treatment plan is properly working for the patient.

How to treat and manage type 1 Diabetes

To manage type 1 diabetes means keeping the blood sugar level normal to prevent or delay any complications. You have to keep the blood glucose level between 80 and 130 mg/dL before the meal and not greater than 180 mg/dL two hours after the meal.

The main ways to manage the condition are:

If you are a person with type 1 diabetes, you have to be on insulin throughout your life. There is no treatment without insulin for type 1 diabetes.
There are different types of insulin available. According to one’s medical condition, physicians will prescribe suitable insulin combinations.

The types of insulin for diabetes are:

These insulins have to be taken through injections and insulin pumps, as oral insulin will get broken down during digestion, thus preventing insulin from working properly.

 

Depending on the type of insulin and the severity, patients will have to monitor and record the glucose level daily at least four times.

There are two main ways to do it:

More advancements in treatment for type 1 diabetes without insulin

Preventing type 1 diabetes is impossible, but the symptoms can be delayed if you are a person with a higher risk of getting the condition and have a healthy lifestyle. Getting proper checkups, good exercise, a healthy diet, and medication will help you overcome your life with type 1 diabetes.

Diawhiz is an Indian Health Tech Company Which is Founded With a Motive to Control Diabetes in Multi Disciplinary Approach by a Team of Endocrinologists, Diabetologists, Psychologists, Certified Dieticians, Fitness, Yoga Trainers and Counsellors .

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Diawhiz is an Indian Health Tech Company Which is Founded With a Motive to Control Diabetes in Multi Disciplinary Approach by a Team of Endocrinologists, Diabetologists, Psychologists, Certified Dieticians, Fitness, Yoga Trainers and Counsellors .

What We Offer

Head Office

Hyderabad, India

DiaWhiz ©. All rights reserved.

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